LinkedIn Series – Expert Power

Career advancement is what we all strive for. Using LinkedIn can be a very helpful tool to show how you’re an expert in your field. Staying current is necessary for both currently employed professionals and individuals searching for employment. That brings us to a very important question:  Actually, have you ever even noticed it?

LinkedIn truly is like the professional Facebook (but so help me G-d if they introduce a chat function); there is now a newsfeed-esque component that you see right when you log in to LinkedIn and that is fed by what goes into your Activity feed and those of your Connections. Go to your profile and look at your Activity feed–we’ll wait.

See it? My guess is that the feed is mostly full of, “You are connected to so-and-so” and the occasional, “You are not following xyz company.” Yawn. That filters directly into the Newsfeed of all your connections and they are likely skipping right over it. Why not REALLY utilize this section and indicate your sector knowledge in the process? Post relevant articles!

You might find it a challenge, being that there are already not enough hours in the day, to post a bazillion articles. Good news: it’s quality over quantity. All you need is a minimum of five minutes per WEEK to utilize LinkedIn for posting relevant news articles and trends that are emerging in your sector. Why would you do this? Three letters: SME. To be a Subject Matter Expert, and to communicate that expertise via LinkedIn is a subtle–but strategic–opportunity to broadcast just how knowledgeable you are of your particular industry.

If you are currently employed it’s not a suggestion but a necessity to know current and future trends. It isn’t only important for you–the professional–but also for your company. Your expert power will speak volumes to your commitment with the company/sector and it will more likely than not give you a better understanding of how your sector is evolving.

If you are not employed, LinkedIn serves as a platform allowing you to connect with the professional world without having to step into an office. Right from home, while your search for a job continues, you can boost your LinkedIn presence by posting relevant articles to your LinkedIn profile. Others will be able to view them and get an understanding of your expert power within a given industry.

In doing so, you are still demonstrating your SME-ness via LinkedIn and that can work wonders for your job search. Hiring managers and recruiters will see this about you and that, alone, can increase the likelihood that they will reach out to connect. The main idea is to continue to grow professionally regardless if you’re employed or not.  Every time you post something on LinkedIn, you are upping the ante on just how savvy you are and the powers that be will respond in kind.

Now that you are up-to-speed on how post sector-specific newsworthy info to your LinkedIn profile, let’s move on to why you want Siskel & Ebert to give your profile two thumbs up!

Until next time, it’s YOUR career: ReFresh. Revive. Renew.

 

By Sarah van Windt – Communications & Business Development Intern

LinkedIn Series – Summary & URL

They say first impressions are everything. What you decide to write about in your LinkedIn Summary is going to be that all-important first impression to a potential employer.  Looking beyond your job title and that spiffy picture you have up, the summary should, in a nutshell, make a complete circle from what you have done so far to your future career path. Don’t feel the need to tell your whole professional life story; rather, let your character shine through. Remember this is a professional social media site, but it is still about you. Let people get to know what you’re about, and what makes you the unique professional that stands out.

Utilize a nice, easy writing style to ensure maximum comprehension by the reader. LinkedIn provides a maximum of 2,000 characters to complete your summary; use them wisely! If you are actively searching for a role don’t be afraid to indicate that. Additionally, you should provide an abbreviated list of your core competencies so people viewing your profile can truly understand what skills you bring to the table. Make your summary a powerful one so that it truly represents who you are, what you have to offer.

Another very important profile component people tend to overlook is having a unique URL. Searches on LinkedIn are done by real names, and because there are many people with the same name, your URL will never automatically be your actual name. Instead, you are assigned a URL that is a combination of your name and a whole series of numbers. Not very professional looking, but that’s okay because you can change that.

If you have a rare(ish) name you might be lucky enough to pick a URL using your name. If someone has taken your preferred URL name, you can try putting in your middle name or initial. Additionally, you can opt for extra branding–add a higher-level degree (MBA, PhD) or even a geographic location (NYC, ATL). The goal is ensure your new URL is more memorable and easier to share. Customizing your URL doesn’t only look better on your profile, but it also demonstrates your technology knowledge. Having a unique URL looks more professional and you can even add it to your business cards. Changing your URL is easy enough; directions for how to do so are below:

  • While logged in to LinkedIn, click on “Profile” and then “Edit Profile”
  • Click “Edit” next to your current URL positioned underneath your profile picture (some people may need to click “Contact Info” and then “Edit” depending on certain LinkedIn settings).
  • On the next screen, scroll down slightly and look on the right-hand side of the page. You will see a box that says “Your public profile URL” box.  Click the “Customize your public profile URL” link.
  • Type the last part of your new custom URL in the text box.
  • Click Set Custom URL.

Note: Your custom URL must contain between 5 – 30 letters or numbers (please do not use spaces, symbols, or special characters).

Now that your Summary is complete and you have a unique URL, let’s discuss the power of the SME! Not sure what that even means? Stay tuned!

Until next time, it’s YOUR career: ReFresh. Revive. Renew.

 

By Sarah van Windt – Communications & Business Development Intern

LinkedIn Series – Profile Basics & Your Resume

You have your basic LinkedIn profile set up and have included (please) a snazzy headshot, but how do you work in your resume? Should your profile and resume match? Although your resume is an important part of your LinkedIn profile, they’re not the same thing. In fact, the two are more like supportive siblings than identical twins: they should complement one another but not match (exception: your basic contact and job info should always be consistent between the two!).

While completing your LinkedIn profile, keep in mind that it should be a good self-representation of where you want to go with your career while indicating that you have the foundation for it (again, similar to your resume…but not identical). Your profile should be straight to the point, but unique at the same time. Remember that others will be viewing your profile. It is a good idea for someone else (who knows you and your work) to review it and provide constructive feedback to ensure you are on the right track. View your LinkedIn profile as your image. Build it accordingly to create a powerful reflection.

Once you have the work/education basics in place, it is time to flesh it out with details. Concentrate on your accomplishments for each role and provide context if that would suit your needs. Additionally, indicate your Core Competencies in the Summary section (though they will be referenced again in the Skills/Expertise section; more on that later!).  Remember to read our post on Resume Don’ts (parts I and II); though it’s true that the two should not be identical, many of our guidelines here still ring true for LinkedIn!

We have much to cover regarding LinkedIn profiles–today’s post barely scratches the surface on how to handle the basic profile. Next up:

  • Creating a strong summary and how to obtain a unique URL.

Other upcoming profile topics include:

  • The importance of outside validation and strategies for obtaining it.
  • Why projects matter and how to work them in to your profile.
  • An overview on increasing your “Subject Matter Expert” presence and why you want to do that at all.

After we cover the profile, we’ll move into the amazing features built into LinkedIn and discuss how to maximize your usage of each one. Until then, remember, it’s YOUR career: ReFresh. Revive. Renew.

 

By Sarah van Windt – Communications & Business Development Intern

LinkedIn Series – Resource For Success

If there is a heaven on earth for HR managers and recruiters, it is definitely LinkedIn. Over the last several years LinkedIn has quietly moprhed into a vibrant resource for job-seeking and networking professionals.

Why is LinkedIn such a powerful tool in today’s job world? For almost every professional at any level and within (arguably) most every sector, LinkedIn is largely considered the best online professional networking tool out there. It allows you to create a powerful profile in which, if filled out correctly, will display your strengths and experiences as well as best position you for your target audience. Additionally, the platform allows for extensive research into sectors, companies, and people on top of its key messaging system, job board options, and additional perks just for being a member of the site (and a non-paying one at that).

The question remains, though: are you maximizing LinkedIn for your professional development purposes? Moreover, is your profile truly effective? Have you learned effective messaging techniques to utilize in connecting with people? Do you even know what those Skills/Expertise Endorsements are used for and how important they are to recruiters? LinkedIn is more than just a profile platform and it is in your best interest to know how to best utilize it for your future needs.

Stayed tuned and check back to our LinkedIn Series for some key tips essential for your success story using LinkedIn. We will be discussing a range of related topics that will be vital to your ongoing career success; some of our topics will include how to strategically improve your profile, understanding the logic behind your Skills/Expertise (and the endorsements that come with those), the most effective techniques out there for connecting with people, and so much more!

Of course, don’t forget to connect with us on, what else, LinkedIn! Until then, it’s YOUR career: ReFresh. Revive. Renew.

 

By Sarah van Windt – Communications & Business Development Intern

The Power of Interns Part II

Having an internship is a must, and a very important part of any path you may follow after college. You gain real-world experience in your field of study­–I know I have–and perhaps even a potential job for the future. But you do have to land the internship first. What’s that differentiating factor that sets young professionals apart to get the internship they want? Our suggestion? Distinguish yourself from your competition. AJ Jacobs wrote a great piece on this topic.

Of course, being an intern is most likely not going to be the most glamorous job you’ll ever have. Depending on the field, most likely than not you’ll be doing the bits of work that makes your employer’s life easier. Even though you might not be handling big jobs, you will get exposure to the field of your interest. All of this experience that you’ll gain is perfect for building your resume. Of course, if you prove yourself, perhaps the employer will let you take on bigger–and more interesting–responsibilities.

Being an intern for a career advisor has already opened up my eyes to many things I didn’t expect. There are different fields that even though I might not be familiar with, I am given the opportunity to learn about them. It is a lot different to sit in a classroom reading text book after textbook as supposed to being out there in the workforce. I’m now able to utilize all the material that I’ve learned in the classroom, making that connection, and use it in real life. It is a very exciting time to take action and execute that knowledge in real life. The career-advising field is something that continuously grows with many advances especially through the openings of so many online jobs. Being an intern for a career advisor will open so many doors due to the fact that the experience gained from this kind of internship is welcomed in almost any business environment.

So what is it that one might expect from an internship? This is very personal, and might be different for every individual. The main gain from an internship is definitely experience. Internships will also provide insight of what is happening in the targeted industry. This is very helpful in terms of knowing what your next step might be or what path to follow. Lastly–and one of the most important gains–is expect to make contacts. Nowadays, you cannot go for your dream job without creating contacts and networking with people that will able to help you get it. People in a company are always looking for the right person for the job, which is why it is so important to make as many connections as possible. You never know, you might just be talking to your future employer.

How have internships benefitted you? Email us to let us know and, until then, it’s YOUR career: ReFresh. Revive. Renew.

 

By Sarah van Windt – Communications & Business Development Intern

9 Steps to Your New Career Launch Part II

How’s your list coming? Let’s get back to work on the next steps for launching a successful career, post-college (again, to be fair, these steps can be easily tweaked for multiple points in one’s life).

6. Brainstorm careers
Now it is time to mind map all of the information that you have gathered so far to see what it is that you want to do. In this step, it is time to ask some hard-hitting questions. For example, what do you want to get out of a job? Do you even want to work for someone, or is it clear that you have more of an entrepreneur and perhaps start something for yourself? What type of work feel do you enjoy best (e.g., flexible hours, set hours, relaxed environment, working under pressure)? What do you want to get out of you dream job (e.g., financial security, more free time, status, helping others)? If you do want to work in a set company, what kind of corporate culture do you prefer (for more info on this, please email Emily Kapit, MS, CPRW, ACRW).

7. Connect with the right people 
This step is key when it comes to getting your foot in the door and getting to know the culture of the industry. In today’s professional world you need to be able to connect well with people, both on-line and in-person. You need to do your research about the company and the people that work there. Once you do that you can connect with those people, and really get a good perspective on the job that they do. One great question to ask is “If you could do it all over again, would you take the same path?” Once you have made your connections, you have just started your network. You can ask those connections to help you to make more connections so you can keep expending your network. LinkedIn is an ESSENTIAL tool these days so don’t forget to set up a powerful, compelling profile before you start utilizing the platform for connection purposes. Don’t forget to connect with Emily Kapit, MS, CPRW, ACRW!

8. Test the waters
This is one of the most important steps of all. You must always first get experience in the field that you are interested in. Many times people have this idea of how a certain job or sector might REALLY be, and they may even romanticize the idea. This is why it is important to go and find out the truth behind your dream job. Once you get your feet wet and really get a sense of what it would be  like to work in the role/industry, you can truly evaluate if this is really what you’re looking for without wasting any time or money. Look for an upcoming post  about how to successfully “shadow” someone in a chosen field!

9. Launch Your Career!
Now you are ready to make your move.  Changes in life might not always be the easy to deal with, but I promise you, the feeling of regret that you might have missed your opportunity to do what you love is way worse. The biggest point I can make here is knowing that planning for the change, being strategic in how you approach this, and feeling confident in implementing the plan are all essential for career success.

The next four steps are absolutely integral to launching a successful career path so check back early next week to view them. Until then, it’s YOUR career: ReFresh. Revive. Renew.

Article Source: 9 Step to Launch Your New Career

 

By Sarah van Windt – Communications & Business Development Intern

9 Steps to Your New Career Launch Part I

Fresh out of college, ready to take on the world, but where do I start? This is a question that many recent graduates ask themselves, not to mention, countless 25-60 year-olds. The thought of stepping into this ocean of careers options, and a world filled with opportunities, might be overwhelming. The key to a successful career launch is to find a job that best fits your life goals and makes you happy. In order to find that job, there are a few key steps you can follow. This 9-step process will shine a light on what your goals really are, and how to utilize them to find the right career path; we’re posting the first several steps today and the remaining ones next week so check back!

1. Recognize the change 
Many graduates struggle with the transition from being in school to finding a job. Some might take some time off while others want to go straight into the workforce. Either way, you need to recognize that there is a change to be made in order to get to the next step. Going through this change might seem scary but it’s an important step that requires time and dedication. When you’re ready to make that change, you know you’re ready to lay out all the steps necessary to start your journey successfully.

2. Create a plan 
Creating your plan is a necessity, and a very helpful tool. Create your plan by asking yourself specific questions. For example, if you want to be a lawyer. What does that involve? What are the educational requirements? Are there any costs attached to that? An important part of your plan is that even though you are planning for your future, your current situation is also very important. Make sure you’re financially secure while planning, and don’t rush in or out of things. Finding and securing your dream job takes time. Always review your plan, discuss with family, especially if they are helping out financially, and make updates along the way.

3. Focus on meaning, not money
It is important to really think about your personal opinion on meaning vs. money. Having a meaningful job might not always pay out the big bucks, but the fulfillment you get makes the financial gain less important. If money weren’t a factor, what would your job be? It is also important to keep in mind that money tends to follow you in a career; if you find something you love but the money is not there initially, consider sticking with it for a few years as you will likely reach the dream: a thriving career and good income.

4. Determine your signature strength

As a truly unique individual, you have something special to offer. It is very important to know what you’re good at in order to link it to the right job for you. Knowing your strengths is also very empowering in the sense that you know what sets you aside from the next person. If you’re having a hard time recognizing your strengths you can take the VIA (Values in Action) Signature Strength questionnaire; this free tool assists in determining your strengths and helping you to plan for future career steps. Our Head Career Strategist, Emily Kapit, MS, CPRW, ACRW, also recommends taking assessments from eCareerFit.com; they are more in-depth and absolutely helpful! Using your strengths will give you a better understanding on who you are and what makes you so unique.

5. Create “The List” 
Now it is time to revisit your plan, combine that with your strengths, and take things to the next level. You need to create “The List.” On this list you need to write down all the things that you loved to do when you were younger; the things in which you’ve always excelled and, really, can see yourself doing. You can also add the powerful qualities that you discovered while you were in college that adds value. This one-of-a-kind list is very personal but do ask friends and loved ones for their perspective as well. Once you review the list, you’ll see points that have consistently made you feel fulfilled and happy thus far. This list can help you discover your niche for an optimal career fit.

The next four steps are absolutely integral to launching a successful career path so check back early next week to view them. Until then, it’s YOUR career: ReFresh. Revive. Renew.

 

By Sarah van Windt – Communications & Business Development Intern